Kamala Harris to Deliver First Major Economic Speech as V.P.

The vice president will promote a $20 billion investment the administration is proposing to convert the country’s entire fleet of gasoline and diesel-powered school buses to electric vehicles.,

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

Harris visits North Carolina to promote Biden’s infrastructure plan, saying it will create ‘good jobs.’

Video

transcript

bars
0:00/1:31
-0:00

transcript

Harris Says Biden’s Infrastructure Plan Will Create ‘Good Jobs’

Vice President Kamala Harris visited North Carolina on Monday to promote President Biden’s infrastructure plan, saying it will create “good jobs.”

In the 21st century in America, I believe you should not have to work more than one job to be able to pay your bills and feed your family. [applause] One good job should be enough. At a good job, you shouldn’t have to worry about your safety, you shouldn’t have to worry about whether you have the ability to get a good life because you might have to go in debt for a diploma that promises a decent paycheck. It’s pretty simple. A good job allows people the freedom to build the life you want, to reach as high as you want, to aspire. That’s what a good job does. And good jobs are what the president and I will create with the American Jobs Plan. We will draw on the skills that millions of workers in our country already have. We can’t just talk about higher education without thinking about what kind of training Americans need to get hired — instead of simply framing it as higher education, let’s create a variety of opportunities for education after high school.

Video player loading
Vice President Kamala Harris visited North Carolina on Monday to promote President Biden’s infrastructure plan, saying it will create “good jobs.”CreditCredit…Carolyn Kaster/Associated Press
  • April 19, 2021, 10:22 a.m. ET

Vice President Kamala Harris traveled to North Carolina on Monday to promote the Biden administration’s $20 billion proposal to convert the country’s entire fleet of gasoline- and diesel-powered school buses to electric vehicles, and to talk up the president’s plans to create “good jobs.”

The speech was expected to help position Ms. Harris as one of the main faces advocating the American Jobs Plan, which so far has been handled mostly by five cabinet secretaries tasked with selling President Biden’s $2 trillion infrastructure proposal. Administration officials said she would travel the country in the coming weeks to continue promoting the plan.

Speaking at Guilford Technical Community College, Ms. Harris talked about how the administration’s infrastructure plans would create “good jobs,” a notable shift away from attempts by other officials to provide specific metrics about how many jobs the plan would create.

“I believe you shouldn’t have to work more than one job to pay your bills and feed your family,” she said. “One good job should be enough.”

Ms. Harris said only that the administration’s plan would create “millions of jobs” and that “a majority of the jobs we will create through the American jobs plan will require at most six months of training after high school.”

Ms. Harris’s focus on the quality of the jobs that would be created, rather than a specific number, reflected the administration’s new approach as it tries to sell a plan that still has no Republican support in Congress.

Mr. Biden and Pete Buttigieg, the transportation secretary, have both claimed inaccurately that the plan would add 19 million jobs to the U.S. economy. But the analysis by Moody’s Analytics that they referred to included 16.3 million jobs that were projected to be added even if the proposal never passed. Since then, the administration has shifted its focus to talking more generally about “good jobs” rather than a target number.

As the administration approaches 100 days in office, Ms. Harris, the first Black woman to be vice president, still appears to be figuring out how she wants to function in a historically frustrating role.

Her portfolio also includes leading a diplomatic effort with Mexico and Central American countries to address the root causes of migration as well as the crisis at the border. That task offers Ms. Harris an opportunity and a risk: If she appears to take on a hard problem and make progress, she would impress critics who do not see her as a policy heavyweight in the White House. But it also puts her at the forefront of one of the most difficult issues before the administration.

For now, her appearances are mostly tied to policies she championed as a senator. Her speech on Monday followed an appearance last month in Oakland, Calif., where she visited a water treatment plant and underscored the infrastructure plan’s $45 billion in funding to eliminate all lead service lines and to reduce lead exposure in 400,000 schools and child care centers.

As a senator, Ms. Harris introduced the Water Justice Act, which included emergency funds for communities and schools to test for and remediate or replace toxic infrastructure for drinking water. And she introduced the Clean School Bus Act to assist school districts in replacing diesel school buses with electric buses, her aides said.

Leave a Reply